Painting is what I enjoy most about traveling. The quality of light is always changing and is often unique no matter where one goes. These are from last year, which I finally got around to scanning.

"Shane White" "Gouache" "Painting" "Travel" "studies" "Landscape"We found this great VRBO in the Methow Valley last June that had a grass roof and a little bungalow on top of it at the foot of a steep hill. It had a 180 degree view of the valley and in the morning the sun would come up and shine on the opposite side lighting up everything. I did several large watercolor paintings, but for the most part they didn’t turn out. The watercolor above and the gouache below were the closest I got to anything decent.

"Shane White" "Gouache" "Painting" "Travel" "studies" "Landscape"

"Shane White" "Gouache" "Painting" "Travel" "studies" "Landscape"

Earlier that year we had a little place around Newport, Oregon about 100 yards from the ocean. I painted furiously to get the above piece finished. Should have painted smaller…that was the first lesson of this trip. The second lesson was to paint faster. Luckily, I found a nice little spot in the woods in one of the nearby parks, away from the tourist, out of the sun with a couple hours to kill.

"Shane White" "Gouache" "Painting" "Travel" "studies" "Landscape"

Earlier still, in May we took a float plane from Chelan to Stehekin, a small town of about 400 people at the North End of Lake Chelan. I hadn’t cracked open the gouache kit in over a year or two. It was good to shake off the rust but to be honest I was in over my head. Again…a smaller substrate would have been better. Go big, fail big, learn big.

"Shane White" "Gouache" "Painting" "Travel" "studies" "Landscape"

Still, it was all good fun and got the fire in my belly once again. What’s great about gouache is that it’s so dang portable. It’s got great coverage and is incredible flexible and immediate. It’s the closest medium to oil with minimal clean-up.

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